Vale Tyson

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Vale Tyson last won the day on November 12 2014

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About Vale Tyson

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  1. Thanks man, appreciate it.
  2. Thought I would let those interested in getting basic mods and regular maintenance done to their sportbikes that I'm starting a little thing on the side and would be happy to accept your bikes to work on. This is just a little hobby for me (one that I'm particularly good at), so I won't be accepting more than three bikes at any one time. I can do things ranging from changing all braking components (fluid, pads, lines, master cylinder, rotors) to installing protection (sliders etc.) and other aftermarket accessories such as integrated tailights, powercommanders, quickshifters, rearsets, levers, windscreens, fairings, gear indicators, and maybe exhausts. I can also tune your suspension for you; whether you just commute, ride aggressively or even ride with a passenger, tuned suspension is probably the best mod you can do to your bike because of how easier the bike becomes to handle and you can expect improved tire wear and grip levels as well. I might be able to order some aftermarket parts for your bike, and some gear as well if you are interested.
  3. I said none of the reasons are considered a SUBSTANTIAL factor in changing your oil; I didn't say they have no effect, they have an effect but it's negligible compared to driving style. I'm familiar with Bob's forum, and I agree, lab testing is the only proper way to find out the state of your oil. So lets face it, probably no one will do this here.
  4. As I stated in my earlier response, it is how you drive your vehicle that makes the difference in how often you should replace the oil. You contradicted yourself when you stated" you are stuck in traffic most of the time, your engine is running, your AC is on", then stated "oil is constantly circulating the engine to lubricate, regardless of whether you are stopped or you are moving". To be honest, none of the reasons you mentioned are a substantial factor in oil deterioration. It is how you use the engine; being stopped in traffiic takes a toll on the cooling system, not the oil. Oil deteriorates with aggressive use of the engine; high revving, hard acceleration and strong engine braking. Tha manual serves as a basic guideline but again, if you drive HARD you should change it more often, if not then you can stick to the standard schedule.
  5. Yes you are getting ripped off unfortunately. The most critical factor is how aggressive you are driving. If you accelerate as hard as you can from stop lights and rev the car into oblivion every chance you get then you should probably change it every 3000KM to err on the side of safety. If you drive reasonably then you can go up to a interval of 8,000-12,000KM or more. It is preferable to change th filter along with the oil, but if it's an inconveniece then you can do it every other time, as long as the odometer has passed the first 10,000KM; anything less and I would change the filter along with the oil.
  6. What is your car?
  7. The only thing that sticks out like a sore thumb in your story and is cause for concern is the fact that she told you she hates him. Considering she is still in touch with him, means she is lying about her feelings towards him or is that he is a psychopath and she only responds to his crap to not upset him otherwise you know what could happen............Definitely tell her how you feel and tell her now.
  8. Yeah, the acting couldn't be worse, but it's full of riding gems.
  9. I agree with gargoyle, parking lot practice is something many riders overlook and it pays huge dividends in keeping it shiny side up. It's called threshold braking; practicing braking to get to the point right before lock up can make the difference between ploughing right into a car or stopping an inch before impact. Work at slow manageable speeds and then work your way up. It's also a good idea to take a sighting lap of the place you intend on practicing because road conditions change from one day to the other. I recommend you read and watch Twist of the Wrist to get you into the fundamnetals of riding.
  10. I agree. I'd take the Mustang over the FJ in a heartbeat. Note that I would also take a 350Z over any Mustang in a heartbeat, but to each their own.
  11. Good to know, I do bike mods (sportbikes) as well in my spare time so thought you were still looking for a place. What do you ride out of curiosity?
  12. @RiBa: It's always more fun to ride than drive, granted there are only a few good roads to ride on and it took me sometime to find them, but it is enough for me to go riding early morning twice on weekends. So if you love riding enough you can always find a way to have fun. Everytime I remember there is no track in Kuwait (which is everyday) I punch a wall......yes my hand is like Bruce Lee's now. @IonR19, I learned on the Apache 160, it was a blast to ride for a begineer and was very forgiving. How did you find the R6? It is definitely not a bike I recommend learning on due to its aggressive seating position and track-tailored engine. If I had to pick a 600cc bike to learn on from those sold in Kuwait it would be the Honda CBR600RR; street-friendly engine and a more relaxed riding position compared to other 600cc bikes. For the love of God do not go for a liter bike, even if you can handle it chances are some of the retard drivers around you will force you into a position where a hospital bed will be your new destination.....for a while. Supersport (600cc) bikes are not forgiving, even though I learned on three bikes one of which was a BMW GS650 I still had a tough time with the CBR600RR which I currently own. Now litrebikes are even less forgiving, it's funny when you watch those clips of people getting on bikes for the first time and riding right into a tree, acceleration forces pull you back and prevent you from shutting the throttle and operating the brakes which causes these unfortunate crashes. Now get on a 150HP bike and the result will be....obvious. It's ultimately your choice, but a 600cc naked bike like the Bandit as you mentioned, or NC700 would be my choice to start on. Stay with Japanese brands, I recommend Honda because their quality is unbeatable and the resale value is only topped by Suzuki (unfairly) because people are crazy about the GSX1000RR (SRAD) here so the resale value is higher due to the demand.
  13. Any luck finding a shop? What sort of mods did you plan or still want to do to your bike?
  14. There is so much I can type here but it depends on what sort of riding you are planning to do. Just riding won't make you a good rider, seat time has to be thought about consciously to avoid developing bad habits which can be very hard to break in the future and will reduce your potential. Firstly, what bike do you plan on getting?
  15. So how's the Vespa experience so far Mark?